National Anthem composer blasts recent statement of incitement by PAM leader

BASSETERRE, ST. KITTS, MAY 30TH 2013 (CUOPM) – Recent statements of incitement by the Political Leader of the opposition People’s Action Movement (PAM), the Hon. Shawn K. Richards has raised concern of another attempt by PAM to seize government by the bullet instead of the ballot.

Kittitian music icon and composer of the Federation’s National Anthem, Mr. Kenrick Georges has raised the alarm following a public political meeting in Sandy Point by Richard’s opposition party recently.

“I am hoping that I am wrong about what I understood from a meeting aired on Winn-FM Thursday night, at around 9:00pm. It sounded like a firm readiness, and a strong willingness to resort to extreme measures to effect a change of leadership in our country, St. Kitts/Nevis. I ask that we pay close attention to the rhetoric, believe what folks say, but most importantly take advantage of historical references,” said Georges in a statement headlined: A Matter of Concern” posted on sknyahoogroups.com.

Mr. Georges, who penned the music to our National Anthem “Oh Land of Beauty” noted that “in early June 1967, PAM proposed a public holiday, “FREEDOM DAY,” which was to be on the Monday following a huge public meeting. The speakers spoke with great enthusiasm, as they tickled the ears of their eager supporters about the proposed holiday. But late the Friday evening, prior to Freedom Day, all hell broke loose. The penetrating sound of gunshots shattered the silence in several vicinities of Basseterre. The Police Station was fired upon; the power station came under attack; patrons of Green Corner scampered and jumped through windows for cover; and the army successfully repelled an assault on its barracks. When it was all over, the evidence pointed to a failed attempt to overthrow the lawfully elected Labour Government.”

He continued: “This sliver of time in our nation’s history is indelibly etched into my memory. I remember that Saturday morning when my pregnant mother, Esmie, got the details of the night’s action she went into shock and eventually had a miscarriage. Unspent bullets were found up and down John Street, and in other places in Basseterre as well. To document the individual experiences, and the temporary paralysis of our country, as a result of this event, can fill volumes.”

Mr. Georges further wrote: “Today, it seems ominously similar when one snarls from a podium about going into town to take back their country, and violence is so strongly suggested. I still believe that there is a process, like it or not, to change leadership.”

“It was another Labour leader, the Hon. R. L. Bradshaw, who was so hated by some of an elite group, that nothing less than his blood would serve as a suitable atonement for his grand sin of fighting for the working class and the poor. The Hon. Denzil Douglas, our current leader, might be fixed in those same crosshairs from June 1967. If there is a desire to be in leadership, and for the right reasons, politicians should proceed responsibly and avoid inflammatory rhetoric,” said Mr. Georges, concluding: “HOW BAD DO YOU WANT IT?”

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